Slow darkening of pinto bean seed coat is associated with significant metabolite and transcript differences related to proanthocyanidin biosynthesis

Overview
TitleSlow darkening of pinto bean seed coat is associated with significant metabolite and transcript differences related to proanthocyanidin biosynthesis
Authors
TypeJournal Article
JournalBMC Genomics
Volume19
Issue1

Abstract

Background Postharvest seed coat darkening in pinto bean is an undesirable trait resulting in a loss in the economic value of the crop. The extent of darkening varies between the bean cultivars and their storage conditions. Results Metabolite analysis revealed that the majority of flavonoids including proanthocyanidin monomer catechin accumulated at higher level in a regular darkening (RD) pinto line CDC Pintium than in a slow darkening (SD) line 1533–15. A transcriptome analysis was conducted to compare gene expression between CDC Pintium and 1533–15 and identify the gene (s) that may play a role in slow darkening processes in 1533–15 pinto. RNAseq against total RNA from RD and SD cultivars found several phenylpropanoid genes, metabolite transporter genes and genes involved in gene regulation or modification to be differentially expressed between CDC Pintium and 1533–15. Conclusion RNAseq analysis and metabolite data of seed coat tissue from CDC Pintium and 1533–15 revealed that the whole proanthocyanidin biosynthetic pathway was downregulated in 1533–15. Additionally, genes that encode for putative transporter proteins were also downregulated in 1533–15 suggesting both synthesis and accumulation of proanthocyanidin is reduced in SD pintos.

Citation

Duwad Kishori, Austin Ryan S , Mainali Hemanta R , Bett Kirstin , Marsolais Frédéric , Dhaubhadel Sangeeta . Slow darkening of pinto bean seed coat is associated with significant metabolite and transcript differences related to proanthocyanidin biosynthesis. BMC Genomics. 2018; 19(1):260.

Related Species
Related Species 

Dry Bean are high in starch, protein and dietary fiber, as well as being an excellent source of iron, potassium, selenium, molybdenum, thiamine, vitamin B6 and folate. Dry beans take longer to cook then most pulses, although cooking time can be shortened by soaking dried beans before cooking. Dry Bean is a highly variable species with growth habits ranging from bush varieties growing 20-60cm tall to vine varieties growing 2-3m long. While dry bean varieties range in growth habit all have characteristic green or purple alternate leaves and long pods containing 4-6 kidney-shaped seeds.

 
Research Area
Research Area 
Breeding & Genetics

Plant breeding is the art and science of changing the traits of plants in order to produce desired characteristics. Plant breeding can be accomplished through many different techniques ranging from simply selecting plants with desirable characteristics for propagation, to more complex molecular techniques. ... [more]