Lens ervoides

Overview
GenusLens
Specieservoides
Common NameL. ervoides
AbbreviationL. ervoides

Lens ervoides is a wild relative of Lens culinaris with semi-hastate or lanceolate stipules. L. ervoides can be distinguished from other wild Lentil species by its smaller leaves, calyx teath, pods and seeds1. L. ervoides is often found in shady or partially shady niches, such as among bushes or under trees, with stony soils1. Unlike other wild lentil species, L. ervoides is rarely found in mixed stands with other wild lentils1. Recent sequence analysis indicates that Lens ervoides is in the tertiary gene pool of L. culinaris2

Citation:
1. G. Ladizinsky, D. Braun, D. Goshen and F. J. Muehlbauer. (1984) The Biological Species of the Genus Lens L. Botanical Gazette 145(2): 253-261.
2. Wong MML, Gujaria-Verma N, Ramsay L, Yuan HY, Caron C, Diapari M, et al. (2015) Classification and Characterization of Species within the Genus Lens Using Genotyping-by-Sequencing (GBS). PLoS ONE 10(3): e0122025. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0122025.

Germplasm Data
The following germplasm data is currently available:
Stock TypeCount
Individual186
Individual186
DNA11
DNA11
variety1
variety1
Projects
2017
<p>This project is being conducted in the agriculture greenhouses with the 7 Lens species and the commercial strain of R. leguminosarum BASF 4035.</p>
2014 to 2017
This is an international project funded by the Global Crop Diversity Trust aimed at evaluating cultivated x wild lentil introgression lines for multiple traits in multiple environments.
2013 to 2016
Lentils are seen as a source for essential vitamins and minerals for human nutrition, but due to the high anti-nutritional factors of raffinose family oligosaccharides the consumption of lentils are being limited. Other methods to lower the levels of these RFOs are costly, and that is why an alternative strategy to develop varieties of lentil with lower levels is being implemented.
2014
A number of KASP markers were developed based on the genotypes identified under the Lentil 454 Sequencing Project. An initial set were used for validation of the SNP calling before developing the Illumina Golden Gate Assay (Lc1536). An additional 350 KASP primers were then designed for the SNPs that were successfully mapped using data from the GoldenGate array (see Fedoruk et al. 2013).
2012
Lentil seed is a good source of phenolic compounds, which can have health benefits. This project will try to find how different seed coat colours in lentil can be related to the phenolics profile. A fast extraction method and an optimized LC-MS analysis were applied to compare green, gray, tan, and brown seed coat colour lentils. Also, the so called zero-tannin genotypes were compared with the normal ones based upon their phenolic profile. The effect of storage on phenolic profile of lentil seeds was investigated, as well.
2009
A set of 1107 legume cross species orthologous sequences (COS) were amplified from Lens culinaris (CDC Redberry and Eston) and L. ervoides (L01-827a and IG 72815). Sequences were aligned and SNPs identified. A subset of 110 KASP assays were designed for use in L. culinaris. An Illumina GoldenGate array of 768 SNPs was designed for use in L. ervoides or interspecies hybrid populations between Lc and Le.
2009
Lentil has been grown commercially in western Canada since 1970. Ascochyta lentis, the causal agent of ascochyta blight of lentil is established as one of the most economically important diseases of lentil in Western Canada. To deal with this problem, the widely acceptable genetic improvement strategy is to pyramid resistance genes. Developing closely linked single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers for resistance genes is prerequisite for pyramiding resistance genes. To develop SNP markers, a series of selected recombinant inbred line (RIL) populations derived from resistant sources will be phenotyped under greenhouse conditions (pathogenicity tests) followed by screening available SNP markers across the entire set of RIL populations.
Varieties